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Hi.

I'm Sarah, a Seattle- based writer, artist, yogi, dog-lover and outspoken feminist. I like books, wine, and gray days. Hope you'll stay and hang out for a while!

Into the past

In 2013, I re-read The Great Gatsby for the first time since my senior year of high school. I'll admit that it was in anticipation of the Baz Luhrmann film (which I loved). Part of me wondered if, as an adult, I would find the book as impressive and important as I did as a girl in my late teens. The answer is yes, and more so. Fitzgerald's a lyrical genius when it comes to prose, and the book absolutely lives up to the hype. There are countless beautiful lines in it, but I don't think anything in the entire novel shines brighter than the final passage. 


In 2013, I re-read The Great Gatsby for the first time since my senior year of high school. I'll admit that it was in anticipation of the Baz Luhrmann film (which I loved). Part of me wondered if, as an adult, I would find the book as impressive and important as I did as a girl in my late teens. The answer is yes, and more so. Fitzgerald's a lyrical genius when it comes to prose, and the book absolutely lives up to the hype. There are countless beautiful lines in it, but I don't think anything in the entire novel shines brighter than the final passage. 

"And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby's wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy's dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter - tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther...And one fine morning--

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

Magic

Paris daydreams