Hi.

I'm Sarah, a Seattle- based writer, artist, yogi, dog-lover and outspoken feminist. I like books, wine, and gray days. Hope you'll stay and hang out for a while!

Setting the scene

Setting the scene

New York is a tough place to fall in love. I've only got minimal experience with this, personally, but my impression based on my own history and the stories I hear from friends is that New York is tough on romance. People moving a zillion miles an hour trying to make ends meet and turn dreams into reality, rarely headed in the same direction as one another.  It's hard to make dates line up, couples go too long without contact, things drag out over time. Myriad agendas lead to delays in dating, let alone settling down and making families.

But that being the case, New York is also a freaking awesome place to fall in love. Your backdrop is hustle, glamour, energy. There's more to do than can be done in ten years' time, a feast for all the senses, yet somehow the city provides a surprising amount of anonymity. Couples are free to get lost in the middle of a man-made, people-cluttered jungle and do as they please without interference, be it kissing on a train or dancing in a park. You can invent yourself over and over, and be free to disappear at any moment, a rare luxury in this world.

There was never any doubt that my book had to be set in New York. It was the inevitable framework for Kate and Ethan, a city that didn't care who they'd been, but only where they were headed. I wove the city into the story with a great deal of intention, utilizing trains, parks, bustling streets and bars, cabs, and even apartment building foyers. In the end, New York is just as much a character in the story as Kate and Ethan and their friends.

Something new

Something new

A guy and a guitar

A guy and a guitar